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#1 Jemini

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Posted 24 April 2015 - 09:41 AM

Ok, so right now thanks to the crashes, the majority of the authors here are the old-hats. The ones with experience and very good writing skills. This thread is not for those people, unless they happen to want to contribute with their own tips or weigh in on something another author has said.

(Note: for authors wanting to disagree with the tip that another has given, please keep in mind that there are exceptions to every rule. You may be the exception to one of the rules they mentioned. Please keep that in mind and, rather than stating their rule is invalid just because you can function without it, instead advise on how to work around the rule the way you do it.)

Anyway, as for the true intended users of this guide, this is a guide for all fledgling writers wishing to improve their writing skills. To kick us off, here are a few things that I think are among the most simple but most effective tips you can get for rapidly improving your writing.

 

1. Know your characters

This is probably one of the most important things. You have to know your characters like they are your best friend. You have to know their personality, their likes, their dislikes, what motivates them, what past experiences they have had that may give them a bias of some kind or another. Even if you do not reveal all of this information to your reader, it should still all be there and you, the writer, should know all of it.

Your characters should be real people to you. As you write, you should be able to feel as though you are seeing the world through your character's eyes, and the writing of the story is just your best attempt to relate to the reader what it is you are experiencing.

2. Show some restraint

This one is especially important in erotic literature, but it really does apply to all writing. If there is a particular event you want to tell (such as a sex scene,) the impact that the event has on the reader will be a LOT stronger if you hold off on telling about it and instead take some time to set up the factors that lead up to the event.

The purpose of this is to create tension. It is most effective if you yourself are biting at the bit to just get down to business and tell about the actual event you are dying to write about. If you are feeling frustrated at having to slow down, that frustration will show in your writing and come off to the reader as tension, and that tension will just make the eventual scene itself that much more meaningful and impact.

3. Try to be as realistic as possible

Do not get overly dependent on suspension of disbelief in your stories, and definitely do not take the reader's suspension of disbelief for granted. You should never have something going on in your story that would never happen in real life, and then just use the excuse of "well, it's just a story." The great science fiction writers of the 70s and 80s all had one major thing in common. They were incredibly knowledgeable about two fields of study, and applied them frequently in their work. Those fields of study are hard science, specifically engineering, and human psychology. It was their application of this knowledge that made their works as great as they are. Some, such as Frank Herbert, even had some very deep knowledge of politics and how political systems work, politics of course being human psychology on a mass scale.

In your own work, you might not get as much opportunity to apply the hard sciences, but you should at least demonstrate some solid knowledge of any technical subject that gets brought up in your story. The far more important one for you to get familiar with though would be human psychology. You don't need to become an expert in the field, but you should try your hardest to keep your characters' actions and re-actions as realistic as possible. This goes back into the first tip on knowing your characters. The way they behave should be believable, and seem like the actions that a real person would take in the same situation.

It should be noted, I am not saying to never intentionally include something unrealistic in your story, however if you do then you should be very aware of it and try to package it in a way to make the audience more willing to suspend their disbelief. I did not say to never rely on the audience's suspension of disbelief, but it is very important that you do not take it for granted. You have to offer them a reason why they want to suspend their disbelief, and it can not simply be "because it is a work of fiction, so don't take it so seriously." That kind of thought is lazy writing and it breaks the reader's immersion.

4. Proof read, edit, and make multiple drafts

A great writer does not simply sit down and write a beautiful work of literature in one sitting. A great writer is someone who just gets their ideas on paper, then lets it sit for a while in order to get some separation from it, then re-reads it and writes a second draft, then repeats that process then makes a third draft, and keeps on editing and re-writing until they have finally polished it into something great.

Even a fairly novice writer can create something great if they edit it enough times, especially if they do it with feed back and constructive criticism from someone else. As you get used to making multiple edits of your work, you will also become used to the sorts of mistakes that you tend to make. This, in turn, will make it so that you write better and better works on your first draft and shorten the editing process for your future works. Starting off though, making about 4 drafts for everything you write should be the standard. Highly experienced writers have been known to have at least 12 drafts when they write a full length novel. 4 drafts for a short story is nothing by comparison.

5. Appeal to as many senses as possible

You have probably heard this one before, but you always want to include details that appeal to as many of the human senses as you can manage. That is, talk about details that are perceived by each of the senses. One important note to make is that just describing the stimuli is often not enough. You also should describe how this stimuli affects your character.

Most people are familiar with the five basic senses; sight, taste, touch, smell, and hearing. However, something a lot of people don't know is that there are a lot more senses than just those five. Those five senses are called the "primary senses," and are the result of only one sense organ sending un-altered information directly to the brain. There is, however, something called the "secondary senses," witch are a result of the brain interpreting information from some of your other sense organs, normally the sense of touch but others are included, and processing it together in certain ways that can be considered a sense in and of itself.

Appealing to the secondary senses can actually improve your writing a lot more than appealing to the five basic senses ever could. This is for two reasons. One, because the secondary senses are more integrated into the way your brain orients itself to the world, and therefore an appeal to these senses does a lot more to put the reader in the story. The second is because it takes a lot more effort on the writer's part to understand the secondary senses. It forces you to understand the way that humans perceive the world, and so by attempting to appeal to the secondary senses you naturally improve in your ability to describe things.

 

Guide to the secondary senses

So, in the spirit of that final entry, here is an explanation of some of the secondary senses you can try to appeal to. It is interesting to note that, when appealing to the secondary senses, it is more effective to describe them functioning improperly or that they are receiving odd or conflicting information than it is to describe them functioning normally. Actually, making an appeal to one of the secondary senses is often quite boring if it is not being stressed somehow by the situation.

Vestibule-Cortico senses

Also often shortened to simply the Vestibular sense, and colloquially known as the "sense of balance." The Vestibular sense has occasionally been suggested as a candidate for status as the sixth primary sense due to the fact that, unlike the other secondary senses, the vestibular sense actually has its own unique sense organ called the "semi-circular canals" inside of the inner ear, meeting at a pocket of liquid called the vestibule (thus the vestibular part of the vestibule-cortical sense.) However, there is a large degree of integration and cross-referencing with your vision and sense of touch to make the sense of balance work accurately.

The exact function of the semi-circular canals is to help the brain determine exactly how your head is oriented relative to gravity. This is the vestibular portion of the sense, however this is only a contributing portion of your sense of balance. It does not truly become a full sense in and of it's own until the information from the vestibule is added to the information from two other secondary senses, the sense of spatial orientation and the kinesthetic sense. As such, your sense of balance is the only one of your body's senses that could simultaneously be considered a primary, secondary, and the body's only tertiary sense all combined into one.

The kinesthetic sense

The kinesthetic sense is the brain's ability to sense your extremities and where they are in comparison to your central body. This sense is highly dependent on the sense of touch and sense of vision, and is a major contributing factor to your sense of balance. The kinesthetic sense is also the prime factor in determining how good you are in terms of hand-eye coordination.

Sense of spatial orientation

Your sense of spatial orientation is the ability to use your visual sense to figure out how objects are oriented to one another and also oriented to yourself. One of the ultimate tests of your sense of spatial orientation is when you are trying to park a car in a narrow parking space. You need spatial orientation in order to recognize the size and shape of your own car, how fast and in what direction it is moving, and the exact distance between your car and the other vehicles and obstacles in your path.

The haptic sense

Essentially, the haptic sense is to the sense of touch what spatial orientation is to vision. The haptic sense allows you to determine an object's size and shape by the way it feels to your hand or other part of your body. It can be thought of as an extension of the kinesthetic sense, in that among other things the haptic sense allows you to know where the end of an object you are holding is relative to your body. When martial arts movies talk about making the weapon an extension of your body, they are talking about making use of your haptic sense.

The haptic sense is really more a function of the brain relating to the sense of touch, and it is something that is not innate but has to be learned.

Visceral sense

In terms of an erotic story, appeals to the visceral sense may just be the most important and effective. The visceral sense is very closely related to emotion as it deals with the effects your emotions have on your physical body, and vice versa. Due to the heavy relation to emotion, it gets rather deep into something of a "chicken and the egg" style debate that psychologists have been having for a while about emotion. We know that emotions can cause physiological reactions in the body. However, we also know that some of those physiological reactions can cause your brain to intemperate an emotion. The question is, do the emotions cause the physiological reaction? Or does some other neurological trigger cause the physiological reaction and then those reactions in turn trigger an emotion.

At any rate, if you want to write good erotic literature, it would be strongly encouraged that you work on appealing to the visceral sense. It will greatly improve your ability to appeal to emotion on the carnal level, and it will also have a corresponding appeal to the sense of touch and also help to create the tension in an intense sex scene. Appeals to the visceral sense should be at the core of every sex scene, with appeals to the other senses being secondary like icing on the cake.
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#2 Jemini

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Posted 26 April 2015 - 08:01 PM



Here's a new one, and unlike the list above this is an area that I actually struggle in as well.

One frequent weakness I see in several writers is in portraying character dialogue. I am not sure if people have ever noticed, but I find it really hard in my babysitting story to write dialogue for the children. There are some though that I have noticed having major issues with all the dialogue in their stories.

The part about getting into the character's heads helps in this area a lot. (witch might then explain exactly why I have so much trouble with those two characters, I really don't have as solid a personality for them as I do the likes of Ms. Harrison.) The major point is to really be aware of this issue while you are trying to get into your characters' heads.

#3 Kumakai

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Posted 27 April 2015 - 07:42 PM



I want to thank you for putting this thread up Gemini.  i still to this day write and I know my skills leave much to be desired. And having a reminder of the basics is always helpful. 



I also wanted to thank you personally. Our first rp's helped me greatly in the building up of my writing chops.  I have noticed a perpetual improvement in my abilities and I often remember many of the things you told me and temper my writing accordingly.  But I still fall victim to impatience.

#4 Jemini

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Posted 27 April 2015 - 08:04 PM



I want to thank you for putting this thread up Gemini.  i still to this day write and I know my skills leave much to be desired. And having a reminder of the basics is always helpful. 



I also wanted to thank you personally. Our first rp's helped me greatly in the building up of my writing chops.  I have noticed a perpetual improvement in my abilities and I often remember many of the things you told me and temper my writing accordingly.  But I still fall victim to impatience.


Oh, trust me. Writing is a craft in witch you never stop learning. I am always finding weaknesses in my own writing that I have to improve upon.

As for patience, I really wish I could show you the first rendition of my babysitting story before I decided to scrap it and start the one here. That was my early work from only about a year and a half ago, and it was horrible how badly I ruined it by being impatient. Just keep working at it. After a while, the restraint will come so naturally that you will almost feel like you are on a leash while writing and there is some kind of restraint mechanism preventing you from rushing even if you wanted to. It is something I have just recently achieved, and it is evident in the work I have been producing lately. I start writing toward the goal of a sex scene, and it really does feel like I am going out of my mind wanting to get to it faster, but some OCD like internal limiting mechanism just prevents me from doing anything of the sort until everything is set up where it needs to be. It is just that I have been intentionally slowing myself down so much that taking it at the proper pace has become a thing of habit.

At any rate, I am certainly glad to help. I often find it extremely gratifying to see others improve. I would really like to see something you have written some time soon. :) 

#5 Sinom

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Posted 28 April 2015 - 07:16 AM



I couldn't agree more. Writing is a craft I have much love for and if you told me in the past that I would write stories, then I would call you a liar. Done some stories in the past and not being a native English speaker is still something I struggle with. Learning trough online studies have helped in this regard, as I am starting to gain a better understanding of the English Lanquage.

I will add another tip to the mix, that you didn't mentioned. Everyone has their own specific style and finding what style suits you best is the next step into becoming a good writer. I have a more direct style in my writing pieces and some may argue that I move too quickly. I won't dispute this fact, but I noticed some readers enjoy this type of wrting, while others might enjoy more suspense. Forcing yourself to write a style you dislike will have negative impacts on the quality of your piece and readers will notice this. Second tip and most important tip of all in my opinion: Have fun! Let the inspiration come to you and don't rush it. The day I have to drag myself to write a piece, is the day I will quit (writers block aside :P)
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#6 Jemini

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Posted 28 April 2015 - 09:43 AM



A note on how to package suspension of disbelief. When offering your audience a reason for why they would want to accept the situation, some of the reasons could simply be as follows.

Because big swords are awesome, +Inhuman super strength. (I.E. Cloud's Buster Sword or Guts' Dragon Slayer)

Of course, that reasoning still doesn't quite work out as we see here, https://www.youtube....h?v=X6QSu1EolCI , However, those are perfectly good reasons to get someone to suspend their disbelief.

Reasons that are not good include to create conflict in the story. Conflict created through means that do not add up logically mean your entire story is based entirely on reasons that your audience cannot get behind. When it comes right down to it, you really can create a lot more conflict by being realistic than you could by just tossing in something that doesn't make sense.

There are of course several other examples in each category, but I am a bit mentally stuck at the moment. I think you get the idea though.

#7 Memmonen

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Posted 28 April 2015 - 03:36 PM



This is a tip coming from reader and not a writer.
There is difference when I read some Conrad compared to smut fantasy (I like both.) The difference is that in conrad I'd never skip a line but in smut fantasy there just happens to be some shit I speedread so fast it could be called skimming or skipping. I've skipped whole small paragraph once too with just glimpsing on keywords.

Writer probably should effort in realising what is up with this and when to avoid that kind of skippable text. I like to have it in pure fantasy fiction fun books in the end.

#8 Tenzin

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Posted 02 May 2015 - 04:58 AM



Good solid advice Jem. Although I am not entirely sure what you mean by the visceral sense.

Also is it just me or does it seem like fewer stories are being posted now days?

#9 Jemini

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Posted 02 May 2015 - 05:35 AM



Good solid advice Jem. Although I am not entirely sure what you mean by the visceral sense.

It means to describe emotions without using the commonly assigned name of the emotion, or the names of any of the characteristics such as smiling or frowning. Describe it purely in terms of the behaviors or the way your chest feels or the amount of energy you seem to have.Actually, you don't have to completely cut out the name of the emotions or facial expressions, but being able to describe it without is a very valuable skill to have.EDIT: It would also serve you quite well to be able to describe a male orgasm without using the words "orgasm," "cum/cumming," or "climax," and also not talking about what the penis is doing. Again, not saying not to do these things, just have the ability to chose not to.

#10 Jemini

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 10:18 PM

Got another tip that I cannot believe I neglected to include before. It came up because I was asked to help someone else with their writing.

 

Know more than you write.

 

As the author, you should know a great deal about your world. You should know everything that is going on behind the scenes, and the motivations of every character who takes action in the story. It might even be prudent to know what is going through the minds of various characters in the background who never speak or take action in the scene. You should know at a bare minimum 3X the information that you are portraying with what is actually written down. If you know these secret motivations that you are not telling the reader, they are still going to come out in subtle hints via your writing anyway, and the reader is going to be drawn deeper into your world as they try to get inside the heads of you characters. They will probably try to do that anyway even if you are not following this advice, and that is all the more reason this rule is important. If a reader tries to psycho-analyze one of your characters and the answer they come up with is that you are just spewing BS for the sake of the plot and not creating real character-driven scenes, it will ruin the immersion for them. As such, it really is vitally important that you know what your own characters are thinking and how it is driving their actions.


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#11 Erundil

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 11:16 PM

Great topic, thank you. Well, most of the tips aren't exactly new to me, but no one explained them to me in so much detail before. Especially the part about senses is invaluable to me.


If you want me to answer - quote my post in yours.

I'm sorry, but I have an opinion on your opinion.


#12 Jemini

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 05:46 AM

For a quick note about all these writing / story telling techniques applied VERY WELL, as in the best I have freaking ever seen, my girl friend has actually gotten me into South Park lately. I am not kidding here, once you get into where they stop just trying to be disgusting and get more into political commentary, South Park has some of the very best applications of every story telling technique I have ever seen. There are some that aren't quite appropriate, such as appeals to the secondary senses, due to the fact that it is a visual medium, but there is no doubt that Trey Parker and Matt Stone are probably two of the very best writers/story tellers I have ever seen.


Had to change my avi because I am getting into some game making. The old profile was a little political, so I don't want the two controversial subjects of a politically charged avitar mixing with the equally controversial subject of a loli game.

 

As for the game, you can follow the game here. https://allthefallen...updated-170331/

 

Also, Elerneron finally gave me a good reason to make a patreon page. You can find that here. https://www.patreon.com/Jemini2


#13 Tenzin

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 03:20 PM

So one of my favorite authors, Brandon Sanderson, has some awesome rules of thumb which I tend to reference a lot. While his so-called "3 laws of magic" are written specifically to help people develop strong fantasy novels, really I find they apply to a lot of writing in general. Originally these where 3 seperate essays he published, but here is the link to the boiled down version.

 

http://coppermind.ne...s_Laws_of_Magic


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#14 Mondoid

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Posted 13 June 2016 - 04:33 AM

Go to www.fanfiction.net, look at the stories there to learn what to avoid:  walls of text, misspelling, crack-fics, over-emphasis on character backgrounds or interaction with other characters and their emotional states (that kills a story for me sometimes), stories that could easily be novels (although that 110+ chapter Mass Effect - Fallout war story is pretty good).

 

It also helps you develop your own writing style by being exposed to SOO MANY others.



#15 FacadeColourUh

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Posted 13 June 2016 - 08:11 AM

Good thing this topic was unearthed. It is a great one: more people should write, and few basic rules really make the difference between a decent writer and an amateur stacking up his own fantasies.

 

I write a lot in my native language, on another website, as my english is not yet good enough to do anything here. I would like to share a tip too, in addition to what has already been said about knowing one's characters, showing restraint, and being realistic. This piece of advice is intended for authors who write in a modern setting.

 

Know kids

If you are going to write a story about them, especially if it takes place in our world, you have to know them. At least if you intend to write something realistic. I read a lot of stories that were supposed to take place in schools in 2015, and I was often disappointed: most people do not know what the children's concerns are, what they talk about, in what circumstances sex can occur. If you can not spend as much time in their presence as I do, I would recommend reading forums: this is what they say when they are anonymous, which is a good insight of what they think. If you want to be realistic, know how they choose their clothing and how it impacts their social circle (when they are old enough to do so, indeed). Know what words they use. Know what they consider cool. In short, know them. If their actions are at the very core of your story, and you have no idea how they tend to behave in any given situation, do not expect your readers to keep reading. Remember: they are outside of your head. What makes sense for you does not necessarily make sense for them. They will notice your inconsistencies, even if they know as little as you do, because they do not picture things the way you picture them. The only way to put everyone in agreement is to know what you are talking about. The readers can sense it, I have experienced it.



#16 Jemini

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 05:43 PM

Ok, got another one, and yet again it is because I was helping someone else.

 

Use descriptions, not adjectives.

 

There are some people who use some adjective like "heaven," "electric," "amazing," or something of the sort INSTEAD of a description of what is going on in the sex scene. Something the likes of, "he thrust his penis into me and it felt like heaven." A better scene would be, "After all the waiting and tension he had built up, I finally felt him sliding his cock into my depths. I felt my insides give a ripple of excitement as my vaginal muscles clung desperately to his girth, feeling out every inch of his manhood."

 

You will notice quite a few adjectives in the "good example" as well. Adjectives are not bad, it is just bad when they are used instead of a description. More details is always better.

 

I notice these problems most often when someone uses a noun as an adjective. Some examples include...

 

Heaven/Electric/Amazing - to describe sexual stimulation. Recommendation, write 3 sentences for every 1 you feel like using a lazy adjective like this in to describe the good feelings. These terms can still be used if you understand what you are doing. Just like the tip earlier about appealing to the reader's visceral sense though, you should be capable and it would improve your writing greatly to practice for a while completely avoiding any term of this type, only adding it back into your writing after you have practiced without them.

 

Manhood/womanhood/boyhood/girlhood - to describe a sexual organ of the appropriate sex. Recomendation, just be alert to it if you find yourself using terms like this. Also, try having used at least 3 other terms to describe a sex organ before using this. Of course, this is just a style preference.

 

Any other non-anatomical item used to reference a sex organ (ex, rod for a penis, petals for labia.) - I have just seen this before. It is actually not bad at all to use these, and it should not be taken as a warning sign. Just be sure you are not just dropping the term and calling that enough. Go on to describe more about the sex organ than just referencing it in this manner.


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Had to change my avi because I am getting into some game making. The old profile was a little political, so I don't want the two controversial subjects of a politically charged avitar mixing with the equally controversial subject of a loli game.

 

As for the game, you can follow the game here. https://allthefallen...updated-170331/

 

Also, Elerneron finally gave me a good reason to make a patreon page. You can find that here. https://www.patreon.com/Jemini2


#17 Jemini

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 01:09 AM

Here's a new one for the list.

 

Make your characters uncomfortable.

This is something that builds on you knowing your characters. Now you have to put that into practice. Conflict is what makes the story interesting, but conflict is not just your characters dealing with bad situations. Conflict can be created by anything. Conflict can be created by a leaky faucet or a barking dog. The thing that makes conflict is not the danger, it is a character's relatable discomfort with the situation and how they handle and react to the situation.

 

You should describe whatever is going through your character's head in enough detail that the reader even feels uncomfortable with whatever the subject is, even if it is not something that normally makes them uncomfortable or even something that they ever thought about and are unable to imagine themselves in the situation. Use the way you describe your character's reaction to help them relate to the situation by empathizing with your character.

 

A good example of how relaying the character's discomfort can make or break a situation where there is discomfort would be to compare two pieces of ancient literature (the written forms, not the movie adaptations.) These would be Beowolf and The Odesy. Specifically, the scenes where Beowolf fights Grendel, and where Odyseus and his crew fight the Cyclops. These are equivalent situations in that it is a man fighting a giant monster, but the way the two scenes are handled is so different with dramatically different levels of tension in the scenes. In Beowolf, they sort of describe how Grendel comes in to kill and eat people, but this is only relayed to the characters. When Grendel then comes in, Beowolf just rips his arm off and kills him before he can do anything. As for The Odesy, Odyseus and his crew are trapped in the cave with the Cyclops. The Cyclops actually eats a few of Odysyus' crew members, and you can really feel the tension as they are trying to plan out how they are going to fight him in order to save their own lives. Then, they don't kill him, they all work together and poke out his eye so they can escape. Both the discomfort felt by the characters and the relative threat put off by the monster are completely different despite how alike the two monsters are. You just feel more enthralled with Odysius fighting the Cyclops, but Beowolf fighting Grendle is pretty forgettable.


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Had to change my avi because I am getting into some game making. The old profile was a little political, so I don't want the two controversial subjects of a politically charged avitar mixing with the equally controversial subject of a loli game.

 

As for the game, you can follow the game here. https://allthefallen...updated-170331/

 

Also, Elerneron finally gave me a good reason to make a patreon page. You can find that here. https://www.patreon.com/Jemini2



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